Arachnotron Development Blog #2

The last week and a half started with the team suddenly getting stopped in our tracks by the green-light requirements we hadn’t fully understood. Dan, the professor running our section of Senior Production, wanted us to put together a thorough green-light plan before starting any new work on the game. He’d failed to communicate this to us at our first class meeting, since he was away and had to call in remotely, so when he told us about it the following week, our plans were brought to a grinding halt, frustrating everyone. As we met with him a few times throughout the week and put our plan together with a better idea of what he wanted us to do, we came to understand why he was having us do such thorough planning with no new work getting done, and the team warmed up to the process, realizing how much it would help us in the long run. I’m concerned for the scope of the game, since four relatively unique levels is a tall order to complete in just three months, but with careful management, I think our team has the skill and determination to do it.

The past few days post green-light have seen an explosion of productivity! I’d been concerned about having anything worth testing at some QA sessions, since Conor insists on taking the game to every one, but with how quickly our team is putting new features together, it’s been an excellent setup. I’m concerned as well that level design work is going to take a while to really get going, because the other two designers aren’t really familiar with the tools or any of the strange little considerations I’ve discovered last semester. I want to focus on systems, and I’d feel bad for taking over on any of their work, so I’m going to try to work with them as much as possible to get them up to speed on everything I’ve learned about how to make levels for this game.

Overall, I’m cautiously optimistic that we’ll be able to do everything we’ve set out to on this project. And even if it turns out to be untenable, the game will be awesome even if we have to cut a few features.

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